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Kids With Sixth Sense

Understanding Your Child's Intuitive Nature

It has long been suggested that many famous, well-known and even renounced public figures began as intuitive children. Documentation and stories have shown that Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Leonardo da Vinci, Winston Churchill and Emily Dickinson were all intuitive children who suffered during childhood for their talents. Throughout the world, there are many children who are future inventors, politicians, leaders, athletes, authors or movie stars who currently share in the same conflict.

"All children are naturally intuitive," says Litany Burns, author of The Sixth Sense of Children: Nurturing Your Child's Intuitive Abilities. "From the moment they first enter the physical world as infants, they spontaneously rely on their sixth sense for communication and protection. It is what they innately know. Like animals, they rely on these primary unspoken impressions for their physical daily survival before language, mental and social skills have developed."

By Any Other Name

Whether you call it intuition, intuitiveness, an uncanny sense, a gift, ESP or "just knowing things," children of every culture, religion and race have it – and have it naturally. "The sixth sense in children is not isolated or unique as most thriller movies or books would have you believe," says Burns. "There are millions of very normal intuitive children playing, working, sleeping and dreaming all over the world today. They play in city streets, on the fields of farmlands or in suburban backyards. They are poor and rich; black, white, yellow and brown; short and tall; male and female. Physical background does not limit their special abilities. Each child's sixth sense is as natural as loving, learning and breathing."

Making Sense

They say children can sense when a parent is frustrated, angry, agitated or sad. Well, according to Burns, it's true. "Parapsychological studies have shown interesting aspects concerning intuitive behavior in [children]," says Burns. "It has been reported that when a [child] is placed in the same room as a person who feels tired or stressed, without that person showing an outward sign of his condition, the [child] will react by being jumpy, fretful and agitated for no apparent reason."

Separation anxiety or intuition? Sometimes, they may be one and the same. "Often an infant becomes upset when a mother, [father] or caretaker, without giving any outward signal, plans to leave for a few hours later in the day," says Burns. "The child may cling to her without explanation or demand more of his or her attention and time."

Another example of a child's intuitiveness is the often-misunderstood connections they may make. For example, at a family reunion, an intuitive child is drawn to the one person that no one would expect to give him or her comfort – the old grumpy uncle, the timid adolescent, the uninterested cousin or the preoccupied aunt. "Every family has such stories," says Burns. "Stories of a baby or small child snuggling in the lap of the relative none of the others can stand, like the cat who rubs lovingly against the legs of the one person who 'hates cats.' Why does this happen? Without the intrusion of mental thoughts or defenses, the child intuitively 'senses' the deeper loving of the person and trusts it, while adults may not."

Family Ties

A 2-year-old girl begins to cry in frustration after pointing to her new shoes and saying, "Foot. Foot." Her mother believes she is in pain, removes her shoe, examines her foot to find nothing wrong and begins to replace the shoe on her daughter's foot. The girl cries more loudly, and the mother puts down the shoe in fear of hurting her daughter. Suddenly, the little girl's older brother enters the room. He asks his little sister what she wants. Looking up at her big brother, the little girl continues to cry. Without saying a word, her brother walks to her closet, takes out her old shoes and begins putting them on his little sister. Instantly, the little girl's tears stop.

Burns says that, like the previous example, a telepathic communication between siblings is very common. In fact, it takes on the role of being their way to stay in communication with each other without adult intrusion. "Like foreign interpreters, older siblings become translators of nonverbal communication between younger siblings and the adult world," says Burns. "Understanding the younger child on an intuitive level, the brother or sister can sense the deep needs and feelings that the child [may not] yet be able to verbalize. Many adults will automatically ask an older sibling to explain to them what a younger child wants or needs."

Two of a Kind

Twins are a perfect example of the use of intuitiveness in childhood. The only difference is that twins allow themselves to keep the intuition into adulthood where many children do not. "Twins also rely more openly on the telepathic connections between them and use these connections throughout their adult lives," says Burns. "Because of the close bonds, each twin intuitively knows what the other twin is thinking, feeling or knowing. There have been countless documented stories of how twins use their sixth sense to find each other after being separated for years, how a twin can physically feel what the other twin is experiencing even though miles or continents may separate them, how twins have a hidden language between them that other siblings may not have."

The Downside

All too soon these intuitive children are taught that they must give way to rational thinking instead of their primary intuitive senses. As a result, this deliberate emphasis on logical reason and intellect causes children relying on their intuitive perceptions to begin to question them.

"Often neglected, overlooked or misunderstood by parents and teachers, this sixth sense in children creates a variety of problems for them in a world geared to logical problem solving," says Burns. "In school, at home and with friends, intuitive children begin to have problems when they are told to concentrate on their lessons, to sit down and be quiet and to listen. These children are taught that the intuitiveness they have come to rely on is to be ignored."

"I have interacted with a lot of children who are intuitive," says Margaret Helmstetter, a writer from Sierra Vista, Ariz. "These children never really lose their intuitiveness, but instead, they are taught by society that without being able to touch, hear or see something, it is just nonsense and so they just stop listening to it. They ignore what it is they listened to for so long."

Handle With Care

There is no rulebook for adults to follow concerning children's intuition. According to Burns, the best thing to do is to trust your own intuition, and your child will be "naturally grateful for that."

"No one is perfect," says Burns. "Everyone grows and changes, including adults. Children intuitively attuned easily accept people's limitations and their sincerity. If you have trouble understanding an impression the child verbalizes or are confused by certain behavior, voice your feelings lovingly and honestly – it is critical and determines how he/she reacts or responds to you. A sensitively intuitive child takes adults literally at their word. He or she will reflect you, and together you may learn more than expected. The greatest help anyone can give a child is to accept him."

"My son is 2 1/2," says Heidi Olson, a graphics designer from Red Wing, Minn. "We had a few months where he used to point to different corners of the house and come get me ... and then point some more. He didn't know how to 'tell' me what he saw, so he just pointed, hoping I could see too. I couldn't always, but I could sense [something]. I would simply tell him, 'Yes I can see,' and that it was OK. He wasn't scared. I don't make a big deal out of it, as I don't want him to get scared. He does not sense good or evil yet I don't think, and that part is what I am protecting him from, too."

We all start out as babies. We all grow into and through childhood. We all start out with an intuitive sense. What we do with it – and how we choose to use it or not use it – is where we differ. "Children, even twins, do not possess a more advanced sixth sense than adults," says Burns. "They simply are more open, more in touch with using their natural intuitive talents in their physical lives. Now, more than ever, children need to remain in touch with their inner voice, their internal strength, creative ideas, self-love and intuition in order to have more wholly satisfied lives."

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